The LASH Rule

As an active member of different lash forums and groups, I often see lash artists and other industry techs ask others how they can build their businesses. They will say at one point their business was busy and it has calmed down and they’re not sure what to do or what went wrong. Or they will say they are having a hard time getting their business off the ground.

I see recommendations to offer big discounts or even free services, to pay for Facebook and Instagram ads, to invest in a state-of-the-art lash bed, to post better photos on social media with just the right hashtags and filters, etc. Phew! It’s exhausting. While all of these suggestions aren’t necessarily wrong, they all have their own time and place. The question I’d like to ask them before they start investing money on advertising and giving away the cow for free is this:

How is your customers’ experience within your business?


Those clients you do have, are you offering them top-notch service that knocks their socks off? Are they sharing their experience with their friends? Because nobody raves about average.


Customer service is about creating an experience so wonderful, which makes your customer so happy, that your competitors are left in the dust! I know, it’s such an evil plan! Your customer service has to be better than ordinary – it must be extraordinary. You must deliver service that is both consistent and trustworthy. A customer you keep is one you don’t have to find! Let’s think about the last time you were a customer of another business in the last week. This could have been a trip to your local grocery store, the post office, a salon, or a restaurant.

Do any of those experiences stand out in your head as great, terrible, or even mediocre? How did it make you feel? How often do you experience exceptional customer service, the kind of service you want to share with others and bring back to work as an example of a great approach? There are shelves of books written about the art of great service. I’m here today not to tell you exactly how to do it, but rather to get you to think subjectively on how yours could improve. Trust me, there’s always room for improvement!

Extraordinary customer service starts with relationship building. Build relationships that help you to build your business success. Hear me when I say this: Listen more than you talk. I believe we were given two ears and one mouth for a reason. You will demonstrate more empathy with your ears than with your mouth. Listening is the fundamental interpersonal skill for value-added customer service experiences.

Have you ever heard of the 80/20 rule? It can pertain to many different aspects of our businesses and can easily be applied here: listen 80% of the time and speak only 20% of the time. You can come up with your own fundamental questions you’d like to ask each customer to build a close relationship with them. I have set forth an easy mental list of things I’d like to learn about each guest to help build off of. Once I have the information I need, I make a note under her name in my computer system so I can always reference it and follow up at their next appointment. I adhere to my ‘LASH Rule,’ an easy to remember acronym, to ensure I have covered my bases:

L – Livelihood

What do they do for a living?

A – Aspirations

What are their passions and dreams?

S – Satisfaction

What brings them joy and fulfillment? Are they a part of any clubs or groups? Do they enjoy traveling?

H – Household

Do they have a family at home? Are they married, engaged, or single and swiping left? (Tinder joke!)

Demonstrate genuine interest in your customer; people know when you’re being fake. Hand over the spotlight to the client and make it real; this is about them, not you. Be invested and interested in their responses and always be sincere. If you meet your customers’ expectations, you’ll satisfy your customers. If you exceed their expectations, you’ll really wow them! Your personal relationships with customers grow as you invest time with them, listen, and demonstrate genuine concern for their welfare.

Ask yourself, “What can I do to make their day better?”

Then give them all of the feels.

Katie Gross